Glühwein – German Mulled Wine

gluhwein - german mulled wine

The Christmas markets are popping up all over London and in traditional sense they have a German theme, because its well known the world over that the German’s with their gingerbread, pretzels and best of all German mulled wine (better known as Glühwein in Germany) know how to warm up from the cold.

Growing up in a country where the weather is warm and the holiday season is spent on the beach and wading in the waves, I had never enjoyed mulled wine before last winter. Standing in the crowds of Winter Wonderland in Hyde Park on a busy Saturday and the cool air wrapping around us we walked up towards the stand, handed over the money and drank the deliciously warming beverage with smiling faces.

Having lived through a cold winter in Germany in my teens, I got to experience the magic of a German winter market and when some friends visited they noted how the small town over 1000 years old with it’s lights and offerings felt like the Germany you imagine visiting when you think of this country. At that time I was too young to get to taste the beauty that is the warmth of mulled wine, but you can see how this is something has become popular outside the borders.

Winter will never again be complete without enjoying this and so so easy to make. In fact, if you have some guests coming around you can put this into a pot and get the syrup ready in 45 minutes while preparing dinner. Five minutes before they arrive you can add the wine and rum and serve to them perfectly warm as they take their coats off.

The minute the weather begins to cool to the point where you need a woolen scarf and a thick coat it is immediately mulled wine weather and honestly, I don’t even like wine, but there’s something about how much it warms you and the fact that this also includes liqour which I’m a big fan of. ‘The oldest documented Glühwein tankard is attributed to Count John IV of Katzenelnbogen, a German nobleman who was the first grower of Riesling grapes. This gold-plated lockable silver tankard is dated to c. 1420,’ which reflects how well this has aged as a dish. Though it has been served throughout Europe, obviously it now has close links to Germany and markets throughout the continent always serve this as if you’re being served in Munich with traditional Bavarian outfits worn by the servers.

The cold is enveloping with a haze so thick you can’t see the tops of skyscrapers, it’s reaching forward to the bones when you walk down the street and making people cower their necks into their deep woollen scarves. While the wind rushes in the doors of the tube everyone cools off from the stuffy interior where coats are suddenly too thick and too warm and one beautiful way to warm up is by making yourself (and loved ones) a pot of this.

Glühwein – Mulled Wine
Adapted from Wishful Chef
Serves 6

Ingredients:
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup water
1 orange, peeled and juiced
1 lemon, peeled
1 lime, peeled
1 cinnamon stick
6 cloves
2 star anise
1/2 nutmeg, sliced
1 bottle fruity red wine (when in doubt Cab Sav)
1/2 cup rum

Directions:
Place the water, sugar, citrus peels, orange juice on medium low heat.

Add in the cinnamon, cloves, star anise and nutmeg. Cover and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

mulled wine prep

Add in 1/2 cup wine and continue cooking for another 30 minutes, allowing the syrup to reduce and thicken.

IMG_0041

Pour in the remaining wine and rum and heat through for 5 minutes.

Ladle into warm mugs.

Serve immediately.

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Glühwein – German Mulled Wine

  • Author: Sylvie
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 5 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 6 1x
  • Category: DIY, Drinks, Winter, World Recipe
  • Cuisine: German

Description

Warming mulled wine is the best way to warm up on those winter nights, especially with a full meal and good company – you can easily double or triple this recipe and serve a crowd.


Scale

Ingredients

1/2 cup sugar
1 cup water
1 orange, peeled and juiced
1 lemon, peeled
1 lime, peeled
1 cinnamon stick
6 cloves
2 star anise
1/2 nutmeg, sliced
1 bottle fruity red wine (when in doubt Cab Sav)
1/2 cup rum


Instructions

  • Place the water, sugar, citrus peels, orange juice on medium low heat.
  • Add in the cinnamon, cloves, star anise and nutmeg. Cover and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • Add in 1/2 cup wine and continue cooking for another 30 minutes, allowing the syrup to reduce and thicken.
  • Pour in the remaining wine and rum and heat through for 5 minutes.
  • Ladle into warm mugs.
  • Serve immediately.

Notes

Adapted from Wishful Chef

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