Käsekuchen – German Cheesecake

german cheesecake

Whilst re-watching another episode I enjoyed a slice of this German Cheesecake that took me a month to get the recipe out of my mother. The mean streak of stubbornness that I inherited from both my parents can lend to a sense of determination when seeking something out and this recipe was no different from completing a deadline.

It’s the golden age of TV, that’s what I keep hearing though I don’t feel that the biggest shows on the planet are for me. They just don’t interest me enough from what I hear of them. So I’ve taken to re-watching some of my old faves and my current re-watch is Chuck. There seems to be nothing as fun as going home and watching more episodes as I eat dinner.

If you know a show with a regular guy that’s funny, has action sequences a plenty and a really great storyline then let me know because I am going to be sad once I burn through these episodes of which I’ve watched almost three seasons in a week-and-a-half.

german quark cheesecake

Käsekuchen

It has been a while since I have made a proper cheesecake and this German Cheesecake is the one I grew up with. My mother made Käsekuchen on special occasions as it takes such a large amount of quark and that isn’t something readily available in New Zealand. It would be such a rare feature that it is something special in our household, though it’s incredibly simple to make so shouldn’t just be left to special occasions.

The main ingredient, quark is an incredibly lean creamy cheese that isn’t often found outside Germany where it is frequently used as a cream cheese, though it’s healthier and the results make this a much lighter cheesecake than the traditional New York version most have tried. The lemon flavor throughout makes this a really zesty and fresh cake that will impress with that dark top most closely resembling a basque cheesecake.

This is also crustless making it super simple and unfussy to prepare beyond whipping up the filling which comes together easily and this doesn’t require a water bath either so if a New York Cheesecake seems too difficult then this would be a much easier place to start. The origin of this isn’t clear, though apparently it has been around since Roman times, but it ‘wasn’t until the 17th century that the Käsekuchen began to grown in popularity in Germany.’ It can readily be found in any backarei you step foot in throughout the country meaning it is a popular cake.

How to prepare Käsekuchen – German Cheesecake

  • Prepare your tin: Greaseproof the interior of your cake tin and lightly sprinkle polenta over the entire base.
  • Cream the butta: Cream the butter and sugar until pale and fluffy.
  • Add the egg yolks individually: Beat the egg yolks each into the fluffy butter mixture.
  • Add the quark and dry ingredients: Once again we beat all these ingredients in until nice and smooth.
  • Beat the egg whites: We want these babies stiff.
  • Fold, fold and fold: Fold the creamy quark mixture into the stiff egg whites.
  • Bake: Spoon into your prepared cake tin and smooth out evely. Bake until really golden.
  • Allow to cool: The cheesecake is best once it has been allowed to cool.
  • Serve: Slice, serve and enjoy.

Tips for the best Käsekuchen – German Cheesecake

Separating your eggs: Due to the the egg yolks needing to be added individually, the task of separating is best left to doing as you add the egg yolks to the batter otherwise you would need individual ramekins to keep the egg yolks separate ahead of time.

Polenta sub: If you don’t have polenta or cornmeal on hand you could sub in course semolina for the base of the cheesecake.

Keeping the cake: This is best served within 2 days of making and is best kept covered in the fridge where it will keep for up to 5 days.

More German recipes you’ll enjoy

Laugenbrezel – German Pretzels

German Pancakes

Glühwein – Mulled Wine

German Käsekuchen

Käsekuchen – German Cheesecake
Adapted from My Mother
Serves 10

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons polenta
125 grams / 4.4 ounces butter
280 grams / 1 1/4 cups superfine/caster sugar
5 eggs, separated
1 kilo / 2.2 pounds quark
2/3 cup semolina
2 lemons, juiced and rind finely grated
1 tablespoon cornflour
1 teaspoon baking powder

Directions:
Greaseproof a springform tin and sprinkle the polenta evenly over the base of the baking tin. Preheat the oven to 200ºC/390F.

Place the butter and 3/4 cup of the sugar in a bowl and beat until creamy.

Add in one egg yolk and beat until combined, repeat with the remaining egg yolks until completely incorporated and smooth.

IMG 6917 e1617282966573(pp w480 h320)Add the quark, semolina, juice, rind, cornflour and baking powder and mix until combined and smooth.

IMG 6921 e1617282992428(pp w480 h320)In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites and remaining sugar until stiff.

Fold in the creamy quark mixture into the egg whites until smooth.

IMG 6926 e1617283021704(pp w480 h320)Pour into the baking tin and bake for an hour or until no longer jiggly in the center.

Allow to cool in the oven for 10 minutes before removing.

Place on a cooling tray and remove the tin carefully. Allow to cool fully before serving.

Slice and serve.

Käsekuchen - German Cheesecake

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german cheesecake

German Cheesecake

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  • Author: Sylvie Taylor
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 10 1x
  • Category: Cakes
  • Cuisine: German food

Description

A lot of quark and a touch of lemon make this cheesecake unlike most baked cheesecakes you would have likely tried before with it’s super light texture thanks to that low fat cream cheese.


Ingredients

Scale

2 tablespoons polenta
125 grams / 4.4 ounces butter
280 grams / 1 1/4 cups superfine/caster sugar
5 eggs, separated
1 kilo / 2.2 pounds quark
2/3 cup semolina
2 lemons, juiced and rind finely grated
1 tablespoon cornflour
1 teaspoon baking powder


Instructions

  • Greaseproof a springform tin and sprinkle the polenta evenly over the base of the baking tin. Preheat the oven to 200ºC/390F.
  • Place the butter and 3/4 cup of the sugar in a bowl and beat until creamy.
  • Add in one egg yolk and beat until combined, repeat with the remaining egg yolks until completely incorporated and smooth.
  • Add the quark, semolina, juice, rind, cornflour and baking powder and mix until combined and smooth.
  • In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites and remaining sugar until stiff.
  • Fold in the creamy quark mixture into the egg whites until smooth.
  • Pour into the baking tin and bake for an hour or until no longer jiggly in the center.
  • Allow to cool in the oven for 10 minutes before removing.
  • Place on a cooling tray and remove the tin carefully. Allow to cool fully before serving.
  • Slice and serve.

Notes

Separating your eggs: Due to the the egg yolks needing to be added individually, the task of separating is best left to doing as you add the egg yolks to the batter otherwise you would need individual ramekins to keep the egg yolks separate ahead of time.

Polenta sub: If you don’t have polenta or cornmeal on hand you could sub in course semolina for the base of the cheesecake.

Keeping the cake: This is best served within 2 days of making and is best kept covered in the fridge where it will keep for up to 5 days.

Adapted from My Mother

 

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