Gallo Pinto

Gallo Pinto

Today’s recipe involves, Gallo Pinto, a breakfast I had on two occasions during my short stay in Costa Rica and it changed my view of how breakfast should make you feel; satisfied, ready for anything the day has to bring – whether that be hiking, parasailing, rock climbing or running from meeting to meeting.

Like most people, my Monday to Friday has a schedule that begins at 5.30am with an unsettling, horrifying tone scrambling me away from peace. My weekends, however, are rather unscheduled, sometimes though, a girl has got to be organized.

This past weekend consisted of attending a friend’s wedding, catching up and conversing with old friends (and eating far far too much candy in a short time frame) and cooking a three course dinner for some friends in their home.

Costa Rican Gallo Pinto

Costa Rican Rice

I had to prepare the food in advance. There I was slicing the meat on Sunday morning still in my pajamas, whipping egg whites and folding the melted chocolate into them, making chocolate mousse so it had enough time to ‘come of age’ and reach perfection. Placing all non perishable food in my picnic basket so I could transport it well.

With those little often time consuming duties out of the way, I was able to cook and converse instead. Making the entire process rather a breeze and enjoyable for us to consume all courses.

With all this going on I had to make the time for some Gallo Pinto, as I simply won’t have any other opportunity before next weekend when I will be setting out to wander, step and hike my way through the Tongariro Crossing – an 8 hour hike where a solid, hearty meal will be required to begin my day.

I’m going back to a recipe that has as special a place in my heart as the country it originates from. There is a saying in Costa Rica called ‘Pura Vida’ – it literally means ‘Pure Life’ and from the first moment of the day to the first meal and everything that comes after that, Costa Rican’s literally live this.

During my time in Costa Rica I was lucky enough to eat it in a few different locations and this reflects what I was served and honestly, has to be one of the most energizing breakfasts I’ve ever consumed…it’ll set you up for whatever your day has planned – work, ziplining, hiking, surfing!

This is the breakfast for supermen and women everywhere.

‘Pura Vida’. Enjoy.

History of Gallo Pinto

Rice and beans make up Gallo Pinto and it is the national dish of Costa Rica. The literal translation is ‘spotted rooster’ which is likely due to the specks of color from the black beans in the rice.

According to this source, Gallo Pinto’s origins are fiercely debated between Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Costa Rica maintains the dish was created in the 1930’s whilst Nicaragua claims this dish came to their Caribbean shores from African slaves long before this.

Being the national dish, there is no one way to make this and most families have their own recipe for Gallo Pinto with Salsa Linzano being the perfect condiment to serve alongside this.

How to prepare Gallo Pinto

  • First cook of the rice: Place the rice, vegetable bouillon and water into a frying pan on low heat, stirring intermittently, until the rice is cooked and dry, but not sticking to the pan.
  • Refrigerate: Cover and refrigerate the rice, preferably overnight.
  • Onions and spices: Place the oil, onion, garlic and spices into a frying pan and cook until slightly translucent.
  • Add the rice: Add the rice to the vegetables and stir through.
  • Beans and tomatoes: Add the black beans, tomatoes and chili pepper, stirring to combine and heat.
  • Serve: Spoon a portion of rice onto a serving plate and serve whilst hot. Enjoy!

Tips for the best Gallo Pinto

Using Dried Beans (from Lazy Smurf Blog)
Soak the beans for at least 8 hours. If you live somewhere that is really hot (e.g. Texas in the summer) you should do this in the fridge. When the beans are done soaking change the water (add about 7 cups), add a couple bay leaves, and bring to a simmer for around 90 minutes. You will need to check the doneness of the beans at around 1 hour because the timing will vary depending on how dry your beans are. You can also do this step in the crock pot. Whatever you do, make sure that you save some of the cooking water with the beans because you will need it later.

Safety of eating reheated rice: Due to the rice being set in the fridge whilst warm and the amount of heat to cook this the next morning, there is a very low risk of getting food poisoning from this reheated rice.

Other Breakfast Dishes you will enjoy

Klatkager – Danish Rice Pudding Pancakes

Firin Sutlac – Turkish Rice Pudding

Huevos a la Mexicana – Mexican Scrambled Eggs

Gallo Pinto
Adapted from Lazy Smurf Blog
Serves 4

Ingredients:
1 cup jasmine or other long grain rice
1 vegetable bouillon
310 milliliters / 1 1/4 cups water
1 tablespoon oil
1 large onion, finely chopped
3 cloves or garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground, chili pepper
1 cup black beans (if dried, they need to soak for 8 hours prior)*
1 medium or 2 small tomatoes, finely chopped
1 medium chili pepper, finely chopped

Directions: 
Place the rice, vegetable bouillon and water into a frying pan on low heat, stirring to cook consistently until the rice is cooked and the rice is quite dry, but not sticking to the base of the pan.

IMG 2202

Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Place the oil, onion, garlic, coriander seeds, ground cumin and chili pepper in a frying pan on low heat and cook, stirring until slightly translucent.

Add the rice in and stir through to heat.

?pp route=%2Fimage resize&path=nBnauEDO3UzXH1USvQ3cvBXLycTL0Ajf&width=768

Add the black beans, stirring to heat through before adding in the tomato and chili pepper.

Cook for a further 5 minutes.

Remove from the heat and serve immediately.

?pp route=%2Fimage

?pp route=%2Fimage

Print
clockclock iconcutlerycutlery iconflagflag iconfolderfolder iconinstagraminstagram iconpinterestpinterest iconfacebookfacebook iconprintprint iconsquaressquares iconheartheart iconheart solidheart solid icon
gallo pinto

Gallo Pinto

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
loadingLoading...
  • Author: Sylvie Taylor
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour (total, when cooked twice)
  • Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4 1x
  • Category: Breakfast
  • Cuisine: Costa Rican

Description

Don’t let anyone ever tell you any other breakfast is the one of champions…because this is it! Gallo Pinto comes from Costa Rica with it’s many available outdoor activities and it is a great start to the day.


Ingredients

Scale

1 cup jasmine or other long grain rice
1 vegetable bouillon
310 milliliters / 1 1/4 cups water
1 tablespoon oil
1 large onion, finely chopped
3 cloves or garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground, chili pepper
1 cup black beans (if dried, they need to soak for 8 hours prior)*
1 medium or 2 small tomatoes, finely chopped
1 medium chili pepper, finely chopped


Instructions

Place the rice, vegetable bouillon and water into a frying pan on low heat, stirring to cook consistently until the rice is cooked and the rice is quite dry, but not sticking to the base of the pan.

Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Place the oil, onion, garlic, coriander seeds, ground cumin and chili pepper in a frying pan on low heat and cook, stirring until slightly translucent.

Add the rice in and stir through to heat.

Add the black beans, stirring to heat through before adding in the tomato and chili pepper.

Cook for a further 5 minutes.

Remove from the heat and serve immediately.


Notes

Using Dried Beans (from Lazy Smurf Blog)
Soak the beans for at least 8 hours. If you live somewhere that is really hot (e.g. Texas in the summer) you should do this in the fridge. When the beans are done soaking change the water (add about 7 cups), add a couple bay leaves, and bring to a simmer for around 90 minutes. You will need to check the doneness of the beans at around 1 hour because the timing will vary depending on how dry your beans are. You can also do this step in the crock pot. Whatever you do, make sure that you save some of the cooking water with the beans because you will need it later.

Safety of eating reheated rice: Due to the rice being set in the fridge whilst warm and the amount of heat to cook this the next morning, there is a very low risk of getting food poisoning from this reheated rice.

Adapted from Lazy Smurf Blog

Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

seasonal
read more
follow onInsta
join thelist
Subscribe to receive bi-weekly emails including recipes and quarterly giveaways.
searchingfor something
%d bloggers like this: